Apple’s Vision Pro headset is impressive – but it’s hard to know its ultimate purpose | Josh Taylor

The most obvious function is for watching 3D movies or TV shows, but it may wind up being most useful at work

The Vision Pro has landed in Australia five months after the US launch, retailing at $5,999. At that price, it’s perhaps no surprise that Apple staff present it on a wooden platter like we’re in a five-star restaurant.

Next, the staff at Apple’s Chadstone store in Melbourne fit the device to your head, match your glasses prescription and get it up and running.

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Virtual reality games helping UK’s deaf children to understand speech

Scientists have found that immersing kids in computer games can train their brains to localise sounds better

Scientists have recruited an unusual ally in their efforts to help children overcome profound deafness. They are using computer games to boost the children’s ability to localise sounds and understand speech.

The project is known as Bears – for Both Ears – and it is aimed at youngsters who have been given twin cochlea implants because they were born with little or no hearing.

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I tried out an Apple Vision Pro. It frightened me | Arwa Mahdawi

The new ‘mixed-reality’ headset gave me a glimpse of the future – and I’m not sure it’s a future we should want

If you ever worry that technology might be getting a little too intelligent and robots are poised to take over the world, I have a quick and easy way to deflate those fears: call up a company and try to ask them a simple question. You will be put through to an automated voice system and spend the next 10 minutes yelling NO, I DIDN’T SAY THAT! WHAT DO YOU MEAN ‘YOU DIDN’T QUITE CATCH THAT?’ I DON’T WANT ANY OF THOSE OPTIONS! PUT ME THROUGH TO A HUMAN, GODDAMMIT!

That was certainly my experience calling up Apple and trying to reconfirm my Vision Pro demo, which had been abruptly cancelled due to snow. But if my phone experience felt ancient, the Apple Vision Pro headset itself felt like a startling glimpse of the future. As it should: the thing costs $3,499.

Arwa Mahdawi is a Guardian US columnist

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Think Apple’s Vision Pro headset makes you look like Neo in The Matrix? Sorry, you so don’t | Emma Brockes

Trying them out, I felt like a cyber hero but my kids doubled up with laughter. It’s a $4,000 way to shred your dignity

The first thought I had, as I put on the Apple Vision Pro headset, was that I was somehow going to fail at virtual reality. For 20 minutes I’d watched as people with appointments ahead of me at the Apple store pinched the air, interacting with invisible stimuli. They looked ridiculous in the manner of mature adults trying to adopt new technology – all right, Grandma – which triggered my second, even more geriatric thought: what if there was a fire while you were in one of these things and you didn’t notice and burned to death?

In fact, the most startling thing about the release of Apple’s new virtual reality headset in the US last week was the nationwide scramble to book appointments for a demo, and with it, the opportunity to spend almost $4,000. The Vision Pro won’t be available in the rest of the world for some time and, while Apple hasn’t released sales figures, pre-orders were said to be somewhere between 160,000 and 180,000 during the first pre-order weekend.

Emma Brockes is a Guardian columnist

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Safety concerns after people filmed using Apple Vision Pro headset – video report

A number of people have been spotted using Apple's VR headset in public including while driving. Some appear to have been using the gadget as a stunt. Others may just have been just learning how to use the headset while out and about.

The new technology has prompted safety concerns, with the US transportation secretary reminding drivers they must pay attention at all times. The reminder was issued after one Vision Pro owner was filmed using the headset as he drove a car with assisted driving features

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Safety concerns after people filmed using Apple Vision Pro headset – video report

A number of people have been spotted using Apple's VR headset in public including while driving. Some appear to have been using the gadget as a stunt. Others may just have been just learning how to use the headset while out and about.

The new technology has prompted safety concerns, with the US transportation secretary reminding drivers they must pay attention at all times. The reminder was issued after one Vision Pro owner was filmed using the headset as he drove a car with assisted driving features

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Viral videos of Tesla drivers using VR headsets prompt US government alarm

Transportation head says drivers must pay attention at all times after clips emerge of some using what looks like Apple’s Vision Pro

US transportation secretary Pete Buttigieg on Monday said human drivers must pay attention at all times after videos emerged of people wearing what appeared to be Apple’s recently released Vision Pro headset while driving Teslas.

Buttigieg responded on Twitter/X to a video that had more than 24m views of a Tesla driver who appeared to be gesturing with his hands to manipulate a virtual reality field.

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Apple Vision Pro reviews roundup: stunning potential with big trade-offs

Early reviews of cutting-edge headset suggest it is packed with sci-fi tech and interesting ideas but is far from perfect

The first reviews of Apple’s Vision Pro headset, from publications with early access to the company’s attempt to create the next computing platform, talk of a big leap forward for face-mounted computers, for better or worse.

The US-only headset, first announced in June last year, aims to move “spatial computing” beyond the limited mixed-reality offered by rivals from Meta, Microsoft and others. It is packed with cutting-edge technology including 3D cameras on the front to capture videos, the ability to blend the real and virtual worlds with hand and eye tracking, plus a display on the front that shows a simulacrum of the wearer’s eyes.

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TechScape: Why Apple’s Vision Pro headset won’t have Netflix, Spotify or YouTube

This new ‘spatial computing’ device is supposedly the most immersive way to watch TV – but major streamers aren’t building apps for it. Plus, Facebook’s AI god complex

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It’s good to have friends. They come to your birthday party, offer a shoulder to cry on when things are hard and spend precious corporate resources developing apps for your nascent virtual reality platform despite little direct return. It can be tempting to believe that a pile of cash worth $30bn, and a single product line that brings in more than $200bn a year, is an acceptable substitute. But Apple is learning that money can’t buy you everything.

Last week, pre-orders opened for the company’s Vision Pro headset, the $3,500 “spatial computing” platform CEO Tim Cook has positioned as the successor to the Mac and iPhone and the launch of the third major era in Apple’s history. But in the press, the launch has been overshadowed by the quiet hostility towards the device from those whose support will ultimately be needed to ensure its success.

Rather than designing a Vision Pro app – or even just supporting its existing iPad app on the platform – Netflix is essentially taking a pass. The company, which competes with Apple in streaming, said in a statement that users interested in watching its content on the device can do so from the web.

YouTube … isn’t planning to launch a new app for the Apple Vision Pro, nor will it allow its longstanding iPad application to work on the device – at least, for now […] Spotify also isn’t currently planning a new app for visionOS – the Vision Pro’s operating system – and doesn’t expect to enable its iPad app to run on the device when it launches, according to a person familiar with matter.

All App Store developers – including those who place buttons or links with calls to action in their apps – benefit from Apple’s proprietary technology and tools protected by intellectual property, and access to its user base. […] Apple’s commission will be 27% on proceeds you earn from sales.

The Meta chief executive has said the company will attempt to build an artificial general intelligence (AGI) system and make it open source, meaning it will be accessible to developers outside the company. The system should be made “as widely available as we responsibly can”, he added.

AGI is not a strictly defined term, but it commonly refers to a theoretical AI system that can carry out an array of tasks at a level of intelligence that matches or exceeds humans. The potential emergence of AGI has alarmed experts and politicians around the world who fear such a system, or a combination of multiple AGI systems, could evade human control and threaten humanity.

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