Review: Anshar Wars 2: Hyperdrive

Anshar Wars first existed as a Samsung Gear title, before moving on to other platforms. This sequel iteration first released back in 2015 and it was a very different beast to what we see today. The previous version featured a completely different control scheme, using head movement to guide the spacecraft while a gamepad picked up weapons systems and targeting. Upon first loading up Anshar Wars 2: Hyperdrive on the Meta Quest 2, it seems as if the entire game has been overhauled.

There are few scenes better than a space landscape in virtual reality; that feeling of being able to traverse the stars. Even Anshar Wars’ cartoon visuals have a terrific impact on first viewing, as long spacecraft yawn into the distance while our nimble craft dips and swerves among asteroids. It’s an exhilarating feeling just being in motion, though my first mission was a disaster as I tried to literally find my feet in a frenetic battle.

Playing while standing feels wobbly and wrong, I soon pulled in my swivel office chair and got comfortable. Mission two was much more successful as I turned my chair to focus on the action around me. Where the first game steered the craft using head movement, this sequel relies on tilting the controllers and physically rotating your body. This leaves your head free to move and glance around the scene – ideal for finding enemies.

The Quest controllers do a lovely job of banking the spacecraft, while also being used to aim the ship’s weapon systems – one hand aims the primary weapon while the other takes the secondary. Guiding the ship using a combo of hands and body, while aiming and launching missiles or lasers feels remarkably intuitive making the excitement of the dogfights feel ever more joyous.

Unfortunately, while this is a great base for action, Anshar Wars 2 delivers a rather generic story. It’s a classic space opera of humans versus an alien race, each wanting to wipe out the other. You’ve seen it all before and the lack of any interactions with 3D models of the ensemble removes all sense of emotion. Story beats and dialogue are delivered via static 2D portraits hanging in space, which feels a little lazy given how glorious the ship models are.

The title screen gratuitously thrusts the spacecraft in your face showing off the sharp angles and sleek panels. You’ll cycle through several spaceships while playing the thirteen story missions, and each of them is a beauty. It’s clear to see where the inspiration comes from – the Star Wars X-Wing is a sexy craft, if we’re all honest – but these still feel unique to Anshar.

Perhaps the most frustrating aspect of Anshar Wars 2, is the more difficult combat. While I couldn’t test the multiplayer, there was an option to play against bots who provide a greater challenge than those in the campaign. These dogfights are much tougher due to the sheer speed with which the opponents move and change direction. Reacting to these enemies means swiftly rotating your body and head – half the time I was glad to be sat down otherwise I think I would have fallen down.

Thankfully, buried in the menu there’s an option to decrease the dogfight intensity, along with other accessibility choices to make the experience a lot smoother. For example, you can choose which controller is used for increasing speed, plus you can choose snap and smooth turning rather than moving your head and body.

It’s a shame that I couldn’t have a bash at the multiplayer, because what is shown through bot matches looks like bags of fun, with the game including a team deathmatch mode and a battle royale, the latter of which could prove to shake up the format, particularly because of the fragility of the spacecraft; it’s simple to heal via pick-ups when in a dogfight, but get too close to an asteroid and you’re space fodder.

On the whole, Anshar Wars 2 does a great deal to stand out. Where the game could get bogged down by repetition, the developers have gone to great lengths to keep the missions unique, mixing up objectives or giving you different ships with other abilities to use. Several moments during missions had me grinning like a loon as I piloted the ship through tight ravines or zoomed through closing doors, creating cinematic memories. It’s a shame the story isn’t as cinematic and does little to set itself apart from other space adventures to make this a must-have.

Take a First Look at the Dystopian World of The Last Worker

A joint project between Wired Productions, Writer/Director Jörg Tittel’s production company Oiffy and Wolf & Wood (The Exorcist: Legion VR, Hotel R’n’R), The Last Worker first appeared during the Venice Film Festival last year. Today, the developers have released a brand new trailer giving you a better look inside the fictional e-commence giant that is Jüngle.

The Last Worker

Very much a critique of corporations like Amazon, The Last Worker is set inside the Jüngle Fulfillment Centre (JFC-1), a huge sprawling complex the size of Manhatten that’s completely automated; apart from one man. Of course, all this automation has been at the expense of people’s jobs – and possibly their lives.

The new trailer is delivered like a customer tour, with CEO Josef Jüngle claiming he has nothing to hide and so much to offer as you peek inside the 650 million square foot JFC-1. Rows of boxes as far as the eye can see disappear into the distance and in the middle of it all is you, the last human being to wander these seemingly endless halls of products.

The Last Worker features quite the selection of talent. From Wolf & Wood’s expertise to the hand-crafted art style of comics legend Mick McMahon as well as the voice talents of Ólafur Darri Ólafsson, Jason Isaacs, Clare-Hope Ashitey and David Hewlett. This is a narrative adventure coming to multiple platforms focused on “humanity’s struggle in an increasingly automated world.”

The Last Worker

The Last Worker is a true labour of love and I’m lucky to be working with the best creative talent money can’t buy,” said Writer, Director and Producer Jörg Tittel in a statement. “With people like these, one can’t help but deliver the goods, but should we fail, I hope Mr. Jüngle can give me a job?”

As The Last Worker, you’ll have to solve puzzles, defend yourself against rogue robots and a whole lot more if you wish to make it out of JFC-1 in one piece.

“We have all become attached to the characters in The Last Worker. Seeing them transition from Mick McMahon’s sketches and then brought to life by such amazing actors has been a fantastic process to be a part of.” Said Ryan Bousfield, Creative Director of Wolf & Wood. “I’m extremely proud of the innovative approach taken by our team to create a rich and exciting world that is as immersive on screen as it is in VR. We’re looking forward to showing you the first elements of gameplay.”

The Last Worker is scheduled to arrive at some point this year, supporting Meta Quest 2, SteamVR, Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X|S. For further updates on the project, keep reading gmw3.

Meta Quest’s v37 Update Hands Some Magic to Owners

The rollout of Meta Quest’s latest software update has now begun packing even more versatility into the standalone headset. Among some of the new and enhanced features, v37 adds a new hand-tracking gesture, makes organising your VR UI easier and sees the inclusion of Apple Magic keyboard support.

Meta Quest Apple Magic

If you love Quest’s hand tracking feature but wish it could do more, well now it can. v37 introduces a new gesture that will allow you to open up a Quick Action Menu by pinching your thumb and index finger. The shortcut gives you access to functions like taking screenshots or activating voice commands.

And for those who want to do more in VR such as typing away in a virtual meeting you now have the ability to pair an Apple Magic Keyboard with the headset. Just like the addition of Logitech’s K830 keyboard in the v28 update, the Apple keyboard can be viewed inside VR as a 3D representation. You’ll find the option to activate this feature in Settings under the Experimental Features section. Additionally, Meta is releasing its Tracked Keyboard SDK for developers next week so they can add both keyboards to their apps.

Sharing functionality continues to grow on Quest with a new link sharing feature. Using an Android device – iOS isn’t supported at the moment – you can share a link to the headset via the Oculus Mobile App. So long as the headset is on and Bluetooth activated, simply open up a website on your phone click Share, choose the Oculus App → Open Now, then select your headset. The link will open in the Browser automatically when you use your Quest.

Meta Quest hand tracking

The last couple of tidbits offer the ability to organise the 2D panels in the Home area whilst the Explore page has been overhauled to make it easier to browser new videogame recommendations, see what your friends are doing or explore the new Fitness and Productivity sections.

As always, the update is a gradual rollout so you may have to wait a few days before it appears. This continues Meta efforts to improve the Quest platform on a monthly basis, so when v38 appears gmw3 will let you know.

New Feature in Quest Update Could Bolster WebXR Use

Meta is rolling out update v37 for Oculus Quest and Quest 2 bringing quality-of-life improvements like interface tweaks and tracking support for the Apple Magic Keyboard. A new link sharing feature promises to finally make it easy to send links from your phone to your headset, making it much easier for WebXR applications to proliferate through sharing.

The Oculus Quest v37 update is starting to roll out to users today and it includes focused changes that will hopefully make the headset’s basic functionality better, while adding a few nifty features too.

Link Sharing and What it Means for WebXR

Although Quest has a quite capable web browser built right in, there’s always been the annoying issue of getting links into the headset from the outside.

The Quest v37 update finally adds a link sharing feature that works just like you’d hope: when you use the share link function on your phone, you’ll now see an ‘Oculus’ option which will forward the link to the Oculus app. From there you can either click ‘Open Now’ to launch the link in your headset right away, or use the ‘Save to VR’ button to have it bookmarked inside your headset for later viewing.

It might not seem like a particularly big deal, but there’s one area where this new feature could have a huge impact, and that’s WebXR. WebXR is a stack of web capabilities which make it possible to run VR applications directly from the web browser. The ‘instant’ nature of WebXR applications makes them highly shareable and ideal for bite-sized experiences. But the inability to easily get links from outside the headset to inside the headset hampers the use of WebXR apps more than you might think.

For instance, prior to this point, if someone on Twitter said ‘hey check out this cool WebXR app!” you’d either need to memorize the URL and enter it directly or memorize the name of the app and then Google it to hopefully find it inside the headset. Or if you’re really savvy you could use a third-party service like this one to get links into your headset a little easier (but still clunkier than we’d like).

Although none of this sounds that difficult, it’s still a major friction point that means far fewer people are going to make that leap between finding a WebXR link on their phone and actually jumping into the experience in their headset.

For now Oculus says the new link sharing feature is only available on Android phones, but iOS support is expected in the future.

We’re glad to finally see this feature debut in the Quest v37 update, though it would be nice to have a similar capability to get links from desktops and laptops to the headset too. For now I guess we can always fall back to hmd.link.

Interface Improvements

The v37 update to Quest also brings improvements which Oculus seems to hope will bring some (much needed) clarity to the organization of the interface.

First of all it looks like they’re doing away with having a dedicated panel above the menu bar. Now you can drag the white line below the panel to move any panel from the larger ‘desktop’ mode into the ‘tablet’ mode. We’re hoping the Library, Quick Settings, Social, etc menus get the same treatment for consistency’s sake (previously they could only appear in the smaller, dedicated panel).

For those who have enabled the multitasking feature in Quest’s experimental options, the larger ‘desktop’ view will show up to three panels at once. When things are shrunk down to the ‘tablet’ view, only one will be visible at a time.

Additionally, hand-tracking is getting an expanded, gesture-based menu. Previously if you looked at your palm and made a pinching gesture it would open the usual Oculus menu. Now when you do the same in v37 you’ll be greeted with a new menu with quick actions.

Beyond choosing to open the usual Oculus menu you’ll also be able to move your pinched hand to select other actions like taking a screenshot or activating voice commands. Releasing your pinch will make the selection.

The feature definitely reminds of us some excellent hand-tracking interaction concepts shared with us by Leap Motion (now Ultraleap) back in 2018.

And last but not least in the interface department, the v37 Quest update aims to streamline the ‘Explore’ tab, which essentially functions as the landing page for the headset.

Oculus says the goal of Explore is to function as a “hub where you can discover what’s possible and what’s happening in VR.” To that end the company says they’ve redesigned the tab to better support those ideas.

Keyboard Tracking for Apple Magic Keyboard

Beyond the new link sharing feature and interface improvements, the update also adds keyboard tracking support for the popular Apple Magic Keyboard.

While Quest has long supported bluetooth keyboards, in the v28 update Oculus introduced keyboard tracking to allow you to see a virtual version of a keyboard inside your headset, complete with a (ghostly) view of your hands on top of it to make it easier to type.

At the time the feature launched it only supported a single keyboard, the Logitech K830, but as up v37, Oculus has added support for the Apple Magic Keyboard too.

It’s unclear if this will work with with both the smaller version of the keyboard and the larger version with numpad, or just one or the other. We’ve reached out to Oculus for clarity.

– – — – –

As with prior updates, v37 will roll out slowly to Quest and Quest 2 users, likely over the course of a week or more, but you can check for an update manually to see if it’s available to you. Here’s how:

How to Update Quest and Quest 2
  1. In your headset, bring up the Quest menu by pressing the Oculus button on your right controller. Click, the clock to access Quick Actions and then the Settings (gear icon) button at the top right.
  2. On the left of the Settings section select ‘About’ at the bottom of the list
  3. Look next to the ‘Software Update’ label to see if a new version is available
  4. Check the ‘Version’ label to see which version is currently installed

The post New Feature in Quest Update Could Bolster WebXR Use appeared first on Road to VR.

Meta Quest v37 Update bringt Hand-Tracking-Menu und mehr

Meta hat begonnen ein neues Update für die Meta Quest auszuspielen. Das Update beinhaltet ein neues Hand-Tracking-Menu und viele weitere Verbesserungen. Bis eure Meta Quest sich das Update zieht, kann es jedoch noch ein paar Tage dauern, da Meta die Updates in Wellen ausspielt.

Meta Quest v37 Update bringt Hand-Tracking-Menu und mehr

Mit dem neuen Update führt Meta eine Unterstützung für das Magic Keyboard von Apple ein. Dieses kann nun auch von der Meta Quest 2 getrackt und in VR angezeigt werden. Bisher war dies nur mit der K830 von Logitech möglich. Damit ihr auch vernünftig eure Bildschirme in VR im Blick habt, könnt ihr euch nach dem Update zwischen dem Desktop- oder Tablet-Modus für 2D-Inhalte entscheiden. Im Desktop-Modus sollt ihr die Fenster frei skalieren können.

Das Hand-Tracking bekommt von Meta ein Quick-Action-Menu spendiert, welches sich direkt bei eurer Hand befindet. Hierdurch soll eine schnellere Navigation ohne Controller ermöglicht werden. Außerdem sollt ihr per Oculus App schnell und einfach Links an eure VR-Brille schicken können, um die Inhalte in VR zu erleben.

Weitere Infos findet ihr auf dem Blog von Meta.

Die Meta Quest 2 ist weiterhin unsere Empfehlung für Heimanwender und Heimanwenderinnen. Hier findet ihr unseren Langzeittest zur Meta Quest 2.

(Quelle: Oculus)

Der Beitrag Meta Quest v37 Update bringt Hand-Tracking-Menu und mehr zuerst gesehen auf VR∙Nerds. VR·Nerds am Werk!

Hand-Painted Puzzle Adventure UNBINARY Approved for Meta Quest

Almost a year ago Brazilian indie game studio Ludact released its virtual reality (VR) title UNBINARY via Steam Early Access, a colourful adventure that was developed using Quill by Smoothstep. Now, the studio has released several new updates whilst confirming that an official launch including support for Meta Quest isn’t far away.

Unbinary

The big news is that UNBINARY is finally coming to the Meta Quest platform, as the studio has received official Oculus Store approval. The release will coincide with the title leaving Early Access.

“During Early Access on Steam we received an invite to enter on the process for Quest Store, for us it was amazing!”, said Egon Ribeiro of Ludact in a statement. “We are excited to show all the environments and puzzles of UNBINARY. We put together the feedback we received on Early Access until now, and we are working hard in the QA process, ready for a full-launch in Early 2022.”

As for the recent update updating and adding new features, the team has dropped in a brand new level whilst improving the visual assets, animations, and puzzle challenges of the current levels. Accessibility has also been enhanced with three different forms of movement (Continuous, Blink and Shift) now available to players. A Load/Save System makes UNBINARY easier to play in segments plus you now have six different language options: English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Italian, and Deutsch.

Unbinary

UNBINARY puts you in the beautifully drawn world of Webby, a super A.I. who has been selected to rule the world. However, before she starts to reign over mankind you need to test her integrity. This involves completing various puzzles across 22 levels, unlocking three different masks, which have unique abilities to help you overcome Webby’s simulations and challenges.

The official launch of UNBINARY will be simultaneous across Meta Quest, Rift, Steam and Viveport stores in spring 2022, retailing for $14.99 USD. Check out the new story trailer below and for continued updates on the latest VR videogames, keep reading gmw3.com.

Best Wireless Bluetooth Keyboards For Meta Quest 2

Looking to use an external wireless keyboard with your Meta Quest 2 headset? Here are the options.

Quest 2 now supports using Bluetooth keyboards with the headset in VR, both across the system and in Meta’s remote work solution, Horizon Workrooms.

While you can connect most Bluetooth keyboards to the Quest, only a few are fully compatible and considered ‘tracked’ keyboards in VR.

When connected, a tracked keyboard is represented in VR with a 1:1 model that matches the position and orientation of the keyboard in real life. It also shows an overlaid view of your hands above the keyboard, as pictured above. This allows you to use the physical keyboard as normal while in VR.

However, there aren’t many keyboards that support fully tracked functionality on Quest 2. Meta has said it wants to expand support to more keyboard models, but it’s proving “harder than expected.”

Without tracking, you will still be able to use a Bluetooth keyboard but you won’t be able to see it while in VR, making it much harder to type reliably.

So without further ado — here are the best keyboard options for Quest 2.

Logitech K830

logitech k830

The Logitech K830 is the best keyboard to pair with a Meta Quest headset.

This keyboard was the first to receive support and remains the best option, as it includes a trackpad on the side. This allows you to have full mouse and keyboard control with just one device in VR. The trackpad isn’t the most responsive but its inclusion is still welcome.

It’s also worth noting: this is specifically relating to the US model of the K830. Some users previously indicated that other international K830 models, such as the UK model, are not supported, but we haven’t be able to verify this ourselves.

Apple Magic Keyboard

magic keyboard apple

The Apple Magic Keyboard is the second supported tracked keyboard on Quest 2. This keyboard is Apple’s standard wireless keyboard, often shipped with iMacs and other desktop Mac computers and also sold separately.

If you have an iMac or other desktop Mac with a Magic Keyboard, you’ll be able to disconnect it from that device and connect it to your Quest 2. Similarly, if you own a standalone Magic Keyboard or if you buy one, it can easily connect to Quest 2.

Any Bluetooth Keyboard

As mentioned above, you can connect any Bluetooth keyboard to Quest 2 and it should work fine. However, you won’t be able to see the keyboard at all while in VR, which is quite inconvenient.

However, if you’re using Horizon Workrooms specifically, you can use any keyboard and turn on the passthrough cutout feature on your desk. While using Workrooms, this will let you see your keyboard on your desk while in the app using passthrough — slightly better than the alternative. It should be noted though – in this instance, the keyboard should be paired with the computer you’re using in Workrooms via remote desktop, not your Quest.

Horizon Workrooms Bonus – Apple MacBook Pro

quest ar keyboard label

When using the virtual desktop feature of Horizon Workrooms, there is support for one additional keyboard type: the Apple MacBook Pro laptop keyboard.

This will only work when using virtual desktop in Workrooms — there’s no way to use or connect the keyboard directly to the Quest for general use — but it does give you one more tracked keyboard option for that service specifically. You can use it with the passthrough cutout and AR button labels (pictured above) or fully in VR with a tracked virtual keyboard model.


What keyboard are you using for your Quest 2? Let us know in the comments.

Best Music & Rhythm Games On Quest 2: Beat Saber & More

Looking for a good VR rhythm or music game to play on Quest? Here are our best picks.

One of the most prominent genres in VR is music and rhythm games. It’s a type of game that found success early on in VR with Beat Saber and has since become a staple of the medium.

If you’re looking for the best rhythm games or music titles available for Meta Quest and Quest 2 on the Oculus Store, here are our picks.

Beat Saber

Let’s get this one out of the way — what would be a rhythm game list without the unbeatable king of rhythm games, Beat Saber? There’s nothing to say that you probably don’t already know — it’s one of the oldest rhythm games on the platform and the VR game that’s had the most mainstream exposure.

Using a lightsaber in each hand, the aim of the game is to slash on beat and in the right direction, matching the music playing in the background. There’s been a bunch of updates, new content and DLC music packs since release, and that doesn’t look set to stop anytime soon.

Beat Saber is an essential rhythm game on Quest. As you’ll see further down, it’s such a hit that it’s hard not to compare every other VR rhythm game against it.

Read more: Beat Saber Lady Gaga Music Pack DLC: Hands-On & Impressions

Beat Saber Billie Eilish Music Pack DLC: Hands-On & Impressions

Unplugged

One of the newer entries on the list, Unplugged uses Quest’s hand tracking technology to bring your air guitar dreams to life. It works like a mashup of Guitar Hero and Tap Tap Revenge — make chord shapes with one hand, as they fall towards the air guitar strings, and strum to the rhythm with the other.

The Quest’s hand tracking technology isn’t perfect and involves a bit of a learning curve to increase the reliability, but it works well enough the vast majority of the time. Unplugged is unbelievably good fun and will probably be around for many years to come.

Read more: Unplugged Review: Thrilling Air Guitar With Unmatched Hand Tracking Capabilities

Unplugged Patch Unlocks All Songs, Revamps Progression

Pistol Whip

Imagine if Beat Saber and Superhot had a baby… Well, there’s a lot more to Pistol Whip than that, but it gives you a general idea of what to expect.

Shoot your guns to the beat of the music — the more in time and accurate your shots are, the better your score. Some enemies take multiple shots to go down, while others will require a short range melee attack.

Not only is Pistol Whip thrilling, but it also is one of the Quest’s most consistently updated games, constantly receiving new levels, expansions and content — and all for free!

Read more: Pistol Whip Smoke & Thunder Marks New Era For Cloudhead Games

5 Best Pistol Whip Styles: Which Modifiers To Use For Workouts Or Extreme Challenges

OhShape

Perhaps the least conventional entry on this list, OhShape sees you positioning your body into various shapes, matching the cutouts in rapidly approach blocks. It’s like a strange mix between Tetris and VR rhythm-based gameplay.

Read more: OhShape Review: Beat Saber For Your Body

OhShape Releases Fitness Challenge, New Beginner Difficulty For Free And Unicef Donation Pledge

Synth Riders

Synth Riders is another game that’s been around for many years and yet continually pushes out new content and DLC packs. It’s a game with slicker movements compared to others on this list, focusing a bit more on gliding and flowing actions, as opposed to slashing or hitting.

The library of songs available isn’t quite on the level of something like Beat Saber, but there have been some big draws, such as the recent Muse DLC pack.

Read more: Synth Riders Launches New 5-Track Muse DLC Pack

Ragnarock

Ragnarock was a surprise VR rhythm hit in 2021, and for good reason. You play as the drummer of a viking boat, presented with several drumming patterns that rush towards you. If you beat the patterns in time, your crew will sing viking songs in tempo and row in the perfect pace to match the song.

Even better, the game supports multiplayer with cross-platform play, so you can go up against your friends in a viking drum battle at sea.

Read more: Ragnarock Hands-On: All Hail The Viking Drummer King

Smash Drums

It’s another drumming game, but this one is focused more on modern drum kits as opposed to the viking variety.

Smash Drums! will have you bang familiar parts of a drum kit as they zoom towards you — think Beat Saber, but instead of sabers and notes, you’re banging snares high hats with drumsticks.

Read more: Smash Drums Is Available Now On The Oculus Quest Store

Dance Central

Get your boogie on! It’s pretty slim pickings when it comes to dance games on Quest — Dance Central was a launch title for Quest back in 2019, and nothing has really come along to challenge it since.

While we can’t say the game has received much new content or many updates over the years, it’s definitely still a great (and technically only) option if you want a dancing game on your headset.

Read more: Dance Central VR Review: Grooving To The Music


What’s your favorite music or rhythm game on Oculus Quest? Let us know in the comments below.

Review: Final Space VR – The Rescue

Final Space: The Rescue

Virtual reality (VR) has proven to be a great avenue for IP owners to explore when they’re looking to connect with fans in new ways. Prime examples include Owlchemy Labs’ Rick and Morty: Virtual Rick-ality and The Walking Dead: Saints & Sinners by Skydance Interactive, servicing fans desire for new content just in a different medium. The latest to follow this path is Olan Rogers’ Final Space series which has concluded after three seasons, leaving fans of Gary, Mooncake, Hue and the rest of the Galaxy One gang yearning for something more. The question is, can Final Space VR – The Rescue live up to the cartoons’ legacy?

Final Space: The Rescue

In the hands of Knockout League creators Grab Games, Final Space VR – The Rescue drops you in the shoes of either Gary, Avocato, Nightfall, or Tribore on a mission to rescue the beloved, planet-destroying Mooncake. This all-new adventure pits you against a new foe STVN, an AI looking to utilise Mooncake’s extraordinary powers for nefarious means.

There’s a lot to get excited about – if you’re a Final Space fan – as this is an official tie-in. Gary and the gang all sound exactly as they should, with their own character traits such as Tribore’s classic phrasing. The still image cut scenes all look like they’ve been taken straight out of the cartoon and if you’re playing in co-op mode, seeing friends embody the animated cast really does look awesome.

What Final Space VR – The Rescue actually delivers though is a fairly generic shooter that’s very short and noticeably repetitive in single-player. The campaign plays out over three chapters, each one took roughly 30-40mins to complete on the normal difficulty setting. A harder mode is available but there isn’t really anything to encourage you back in, one shot straight through felt enough.

Final Space: The Rescue

Essentially an elaborate wave shooter as you get locked down in rooms which you have to clear before moving on, enemies come in three flavours. You’ve got the robots (called S.A.M.E.S) with a basic grunt that charges, one with a rifle that keeps its distance (they do actually dodge and dive out the way a little), small annoying bugs which scuttle across the ground then leap at your face and flying drones. Other than the boss sections to break up the gameplay, walking through room after room facing the same basic opponents is a real misfire considering the amount of creatures Final Space featured over its 33 episodes.   

To deal with these foes you can pick up a selection of weaponry along the way, a Pistol, SMG, Shotgun, Plasma Rifle and Grenade Launcher. None of them requires ammo and they all reload automatically. The four guns can instantly be reloaded by hitting the trigger at the correct moment. This quick reload feature is common in shooters but in a VR game where you’re dual-wielding, it becomes an unnecessary burden as the bar isn’t always in view.

You can arm yourself to the teeth though. Holding a total of four weapons – one on each shoulder and one in each hand – it’s very easy to switch between them depending on your strategy for each situation. They can all be held with both hands for a better aim yet without any recoil why bother, simply go out two shotguns blazing.

Final Space VR - The Rescue

Final Space VR – The Rescue is noticeably lacking other interactive elements. There’s nothing to pick up as cookies to help heal you are automatically collected by walking through them and the same with door key cards. You don’t have to climb anything and there are no grenades to throw, the closest you’ll get is being able to gun butt enemies.   

So the single-player isn’t really selling Final Space VR – The Rescue. However, Final Space was never just about one character and it is in the co-op where the experience really shines. There’s a random matchmaking option if you need it although what you really want is a bunch of Final Space loving mates to team up with. Offering clear voice chat – with the settings allowing for fully open or activated by pressing A or X – the experience quickly falls into place as everyone unleashes some Final Space banter.

There is something missing though. And it wasn’t until the third chapter that the realisation struck, it’s devoid of Final Space’s crazy action sequences. Almost every episode seemed to feature Gary and the team doing some death-defying leap down onto a planet or flying into a sun. There’s none of that here. The outlandishness of the cartoon hasn’t been brought over, feeling very safe in comparison to what could’ve been created.  

Final Space has a legion of loyal fans and that’s exactly who Final Space VR – The Rescue is being catered towards. If you’ve never seen the show and you buy this as a single-player shooter you’ll be disappointed. It looks good, sounds great and plays well yet there’s so much missing to make this an awesome sci-fi FPS. You need friends who love the cartoon to truly get something out of Final Space VR – The Rescue. Another concern was that there was no teleport to be found and no additional gameplay modes. A co-op like this would’ve benefited from a horde mode or something to keep you coming back for more. Final Space VR – The Rescue had its fun moments but just like the show, it ended too soon.  

Review: Final Space VR – The Rescue

Virtual reality (VR) has proven to be a great avenue for IP owners to explore when they’re looking to connect with fans in new ways. Prime examples include Owlchemy Labs’ Rick and Morty: Virtual Rick-ality and The Walking Dead: Saints & Sinners by Skydance Interactive, servicing fans desire for new content just in a different medium. The latest to follow this path is Olan Rogers’ Final Space series which has concluded after three seasons, leaving fans of Gary, Mooncake, Hue and the rest of the Galaxy One gang yearning for something more. The question is, can Final Space VR – The Rescue live up to the cartoons’ legacy?

Final Space: The Rescue

In the hands of Knockout League creators Grab Games, Final Space VR – The Rescue drops you in the shoes of either Gary, Avocato, Nightfall, or Tribore on a mission to rescue the beloved, planet-destroying Mooncake. This all-new adventure pits you against a new foe STVN, an AI looking to utilise Mooncake’s extraordinary powers for nefarious means.

There’s a lot to get excited about – if you’re a Final Space fan – as this is an official tie-in. Gary and the gang all sound exactly as they should, with their own character traits such as Tribore’s classic phrasing. The still image cut scenes all look like they’ve been taken straight out of the cartoon and if you’re playing in co-op mode, seeing friends embody the animated cast really does look awesome.

What Final Space VR – The Rescue actually delivers though is a fairly generic shooter that’s very short and noticeably repetitive in single-player. The campaign plays out over three chapters, each one took roughly 30-40mins to complete on the normal difficulty setting. A harder mode is available but there isn’t really anything to encourage you back in, one shot straight through felt enough.

Final Space: The Rescue

Essentially an elaborate wave shooter as you get locked down in rooms which you have to clear before moving on, enemies come in three flavours. You’ve got the robots (called S.A.M.E.S) with a basic grunt that charges, one with a rifle that keeps its distance (they do actually dodge and dive out the way a little), small annoying bugs which scuttle across the ground then leap at your face and flying drones. Other than the boss sections to break up the gameplay, walking through room after room facing the same basic opponents is a real misfire considering the amount of creatures Final Space featured over its 33 episodes.   

To deal with these foes you can pick up a selection of weaponry along the way, a Pistol, SMG, Shotgun, Plasma Rifle and Grenade Launcher. None of them requires ammo and they all reload automatically. The four guns can instantly be reloaded by hitting the trigger at the correct moment. This quick reload feature is common in shooters but in a VR game where you’re dual-wielding, it becomes an unnecessary burden as the bar isn’t always in view.

You can arm yourself to the teeth though. Holding a total of four weapons – one on each shoulder and one in each hand – it’s very easy to switch between them depending on your strategy for each situation. They can all be held with both hands for a better aim yet without any recoil why bother, simply go out two shotguns blazing.

Final Space VR - The Rescue

Final Space VR – The Rescue is noticeably lacking other interactive elements. There’s nothing to pick up as cookies to help heal you are automatically collected by walking through them and the same with door key cards. You don’t have to climb anything and there are no grenades to throw, the closest you’ll get is being able to gun butt enemies.   

So the single-player isn’t really selling Final Space VR – The Rescue. However, Final Space was never just about one character and it is in the co-op where the experience really shines. There’s a random matchmaking option if you need it although what you really want is a bunch of Final Space loving mates to team up with. Offering clear voice chat – with the settings allowing for fully open or activated by pressing A or X – the experience quickly falls into place as everyone unleashes some Final Space banter.

There is something missing though. And it wasn’t until the third chapter that the realisation struck, it’s devoid of Final Space’s crazy action sequences. Almost every episode seemed to feature Gary and the team doing some death-defying leap down onto a planet or flying into a sun. There’s none of that here. The outlandishness of the cartoon hasn’t been brought over, feeling very safe in comparison to what could’ve been created.  

Final Space has a legion of loyal fans and that’s exactly who Final Space VR – The Rescue is being catered towards. If you’ve never seen the show and you buy this as a single-player shooter you’ll be disappointed. It looks good, sounds great and plays well yet there’s so much missing to make this an awesome sci-fi FPS. You need friends who love the cartoon to truly get something out of Final Space VR – The Rescue. Another concern was that there was no teleport to be found and no additional gameplay modes. A co-op like this would’ve benefited from a horde mode or something to keep you coming back for more. Final Space VR – The Rescue had its fun moments but just like the show, it ended too soon.