GENESIS: Exklusive Zeitreise in der Magenta VR App (sponsored post)

VR-Brillen sind nicht nur interessant für Gamer, sondern ermöglichen es uns auch, Geschichte erfahrbar zu machen. In Genesis begebt ihr euch auf eine Zeitreise, welche die Vergänglichkeit des Lebens auf der Erde in eindrucksvoller Weise zeigt. 

Das Lehrbuch zum Eintauchen

Es gab in der Geschichte der Erde immer wieder zerstörerische Katastrophen der Superlative, welche unsere Erde prägten: Kosmisches Dauerfeuer, vernichtende Meteoriten, endlose Sintfluten, gewaltige Riesenechsen. 

Genesis nimmt euch mit auf eine Reise durch diese Zeiten und zeigt, wie schön und gleichzeitig vergänglich das Leben auf diesem Planeten ist. So werdet ihr beispielsweise gigantische Dinosaurier treffen, durch die Tiefen der frühen Ozeane tauchen und euch in einem kosmischen Trümmerfeld wiederfinden. 

Genesis steht ab sofort exklusiv und kostenlos in der Magenta VR App für iOS, Android und Oculus Go bereit. 

Der Beitrag GENESIS: Exklusive Zeitreise in der Magenta VR App (sponsored post) zuerst gesehen auf VR∙Nerds. VR·Nerds am Werk!

Carmack Confirms Oculus Quest 2 has Dropped Oculus Go Support

Oculus Go GDC Promo 03

Oculus’ first standalone headset, the 3DoF Oculus Go is on its way out with Facebook discontinuing the headset this year. Those who had the device (or Gear VR) could still access some of the content via Oculus Quest but with the newer version now available that backwards compatibility has been dropped.

Oculus Quest 2

There were 66 apps and videogames which could be played on the original Oculus Quest, accessed via a drop-down tab in the Quest library. That feature is absent in the new UI for Quest 2, with John Carmack confirming via Twitter: “Support was remove on Quest 2. I totally lost the internal debate over backwards compatibility.”

While there are plenty of Oculus Quest’s out there able to access the content, this info does mean the end is in sight for all these titles. Some like Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes and Republique VR received Quest upgrades but those including Coatsink’s They Suspect Nothing, Daedalus by Vertical Robot and ustwo Games’ Land’s End were only available on those early platforms.

Some did manage to make use of Oculus Quest’s 6 degrees of freedom (6DoF) controls but most were still consigned to 3DoF. That tech only allowed for basic controller movement making for point and click style experiences. So it’s not surprising that with the lack of immersive controls 3DoF titles are getting left behind when it comes to pushing VR mainstream.

Land's End

Of course, that does mean if you’ve been enjoying VR for many years with a library which includes some of these titles you’ll want to hold onto those headsets to ensure the content is still accessible.

Oculus Go sales end this year with Facebook still planning to support the platform with bug fixes and security patches through 2022. Also on the way out is Oculus Rift S, being dropped next Spring, leaving just Oculus Quest 2 as the company’s sole VR headset.

For the latest VR updates from Facebook, keep reading VRFocus.

Quest 2 Drops Backwards Compatibility with Oculus Go Apps & Games

It was a little over a year ago when Facebook triumphantly announced that games and apps made for Oculus Go would live on in Oculus Quest. But now with Go long gone and Quest 1 out of production, the company has decided to no longer support Go titles through Quest 2.

Quest 2 has been in the hands of consumers for less than a week, and while there’s plenty of great content to play, some were left wondering where the dropdown menu for Go games disappeared to on Quest 2.

Legendary programmer and Oculus Consulting CTO John Carmack responded to one such complaint via Twitter, saying Go apps are indeed not supported on Quest 2.

“I totally lost the internal debate over backwards compatibility,” Carmack reveals.

Quest (2019) and Go, Images courtesy Oculus

If you haven’t followed the growth of Oculus over the years, among other things, Carmack was an instrumental force in both driving the company to build the smartphone-based Gear VR headset in 2015 and eventually crystalize that into the 3DOF standalone Oculus Go in 2018.

Launched nearly one year later, the original Quest included a compatibility layer that essentially made Quest report as a Go, which also allowed for Go controller emulation in older games. At the time it made sense to bring Go’s library of 3DOF games and experiences to help fill out the Quest’s comparably much smaller block of native content.

That’s certainly not the case today though, as Quest has managed to attract loads of developers looking to build for the headset, which generated over $100 million in app revenue in its first year alone.

Still, even with a boat load of Quest-native titles bringing near-PC quality to the table, it’s sad to see some of the legacy games that never got proper Quest ports like Smash Hit (2015) inevitably begin to fade away into what Facebook Reality Labs’ (then Oculus Chief Scientist) called “the good old days” in his 2015 Connect keynote. If you’re feeling nostalgic, you can give it a watch here.

The post Quest 2 Drops Backwards Compatibility with Oculus Go Apps & Games appeared first on Road to VR.

Quest 2 Drops Backwards Compatibility with Oculus Go Apps & Games

It was a little over a year ago when Facebook triumphantly announced that games and apps made for Oculus Go would live on in Oculus Quest. But now with Go long gone and Quest 1 out of production, the company has decided to no longer support Go titles through Quest 2.

Quest 2 has been in the hands of consumers for less than a week, and while there’s plenty of great content to play, some were left wondering where the dropdown menu for Go games disappeared to on Quest 2.

Legendary programmer and Oculus Consulting CTO John Carmack responded to one such complaint via Twitter, saying Go apps are indeed not supported on Quest 2.

“I totally lost the internal debate over backwards compatibility,” Carmack reveals.

Quest (2019) and Go, Images courtesy Oculus

If you haven’t followed the growth of Oculus over the years, among other things, Carmack was an instrumental force in both driving the company to build the smartphone-based Gear VR headset in 2015 and eventually crystalize that into the 3DOF standalone Oculus Go in 2018.

Launched nearly one year later, the original Quest included a compatibility layer that essentially made Quest report as a Go, which also allowed for Go controller emulation in older games. At the time it made sense to bring Go’s library of 3DOF games and experiences to help fill out the Quest’s comparably much smaller block of native content.

That’s certainly not the case today though, as Quest has managed to attract loads of developers looking to build for the headset, which generated over $100 million in app revenue in its first year alone.

Still, even with a boat load of Quest-native titles bringing near-PC quality to the table, it’s sad to see some of the legacy games that never got proper Quest ports like Smash Hit (2015) inevitably begin to fade away into what Facebook Reality Labs’ (then Oculus Chief Scientist) called “the good old days” in his 2015 Connect keynote. If you’re feeling nostalgic, you can give it a watch here.

The post Quest 2 Drops Backwards Compatibility with Oculus Go Apps & Games appeared first on Road to VR.

Oculus Quest 2 Can’t Play Oculus Go Apps Compatible With Quest 1

The Oculus Quest 2 can’t play the selection of Oculus Go games made available on the original Quest, John Carmack confirmed.

While Quest 2 has full backward compatibility support for every game and app that released natively for the standalone headset, there’s no option to access any of the titles available on Oculus Go and Gear VR. Around this time last year, Facebook made about 50 Go games compatible on Quest. You couldn’t buy these games from inside the headset itself but, if you already owned them, you could download them via a separate tab in your library.

But that tab is nowhere to be found on Quest 2 and, in a tweet yesterday, John Carmack confirmed Go support had been dropped for Quest 2, despite his protests. “I totally lost the internal debate over backwards compatibility,” the developer said.

Go is a standalone headset like Quest, but only features simplistic three degrees of freedom (3DOF) tracking. That means you can’t physically move your head and hands through virtual space, just tilt them to look around or point at things. Earlier this year, Facebook confirmed that it would stop selling Go, however, just like it confirmed it would no longer sell Rift headsets last month.

On Quest, some of the selection of Go apps had access to 6DOF controls (though some were still limited to 3DOF too). There were some great experiences on the list, like Coatsink’s A Night Sky and ustwo games’ Land’s End. With no Oculus Go support on Quest 2, it appears apps like these will truly be lost to the past.

What do you make of Oculus Go games not working on Quest? Let us know in the comments below.

New Trailer and Screenshots Arrive for Spice and Wolf VR 2

Spice and Wolf VR 2

Several weeks ago Japanese studio Spicy Tails announced a sequel to its virtual reality (VR) animation Spice and Wolf VR, continuing the story of Holo and Kraft Lawrence. This week the first teaser trailer has dropped alongside new screenshots, revealing the plotline for the first time.

Spice and Wolf VR 2 does continue the story, with Lawrence ending his travelling merchant lifestyle and settling down with the wolf goddess Holo, opening a bathhouse together. Living an idyllic life they have a daughter Myuri until: “One day, as Lawrence is going about his fur side business to further fill the family’s coffers, a slight incident occurs and Holo saunters in with quite the feast,” the synopsis explains.

Developed in conjunction with Gemdrop Game Studios, Spice and Wolf VR 2 is being built for PlayStation VR, HTC Vive, Oculus Rift and Oculus Go as well as Nintendo Switch. As Spicy Tails previously revealed, the title won’t natively support Oculus Quest due to failing the certification process. It did state, however, that Spice and Wolf VR 2 would still be playable on the standalone headset via Oculus Link for those that have a PC.

If you’ve not seen Spice and Wolf VR yet, the title is based-on Isuna Hasekura’s original novel which sees Lawrence stop in the town of Pasloe where he meets the 600-year-old Holo. She takes the form of a teenage girl – apart from her apparent wolf tail and ears – joining him on his travels.

Currently, there’s no release date for Spice and Wolf VR 2 with Spicy Tails merely saying it’s coming soon. It’ll retail for $24.99 USD when it does. As VRFocus previously noted, that could happen this year simply because new Oculus Go apps won’t be added to the store after 18th December, due to the headset being discontinued.

Check out the new teaser trailer below and for further updates on the VR adaption of the light novel, keep reading VRFocus.

Oculus Unity & Unreal SDKs Deprecate Oculus Go Support

Facebook no longer supports Oculus Go in the latest version of the Oculus Unity & Unreal Integrations.

Oculus Go launched in May 2018, just over two years ago, as Facebook’s first standalone headset. Priced at $199, it’s primarily used for passive consumption of immersive and traditional media.

In January Facebook removed Go from its enterprise offering, and in June stopped selling it to consumers, vowing no more 3DoF VR products.

This deprecation means Go isn’t officially supported in v19 of the Unity & Unreal Oculus integrations, and could lead developers to stop updating Go versions.

Developers can still use v18 to develop for Go, but the Oculus Go Store will stop accepting app updates and new apps in December.

3DoF Input: Hard To Accommodate?

Go’s media viewing use cases emerged around its wireless, decent resolution experience and its major limitation- one which no other major headset has. Go can only track your head’s rotation, not position. If you lean forward, backward, or to the side, the entire world moves as if attached to your head. This is an uncomfortable feeling and can make some people feel sick.

Image from Aniwaa

But what is more likely behind Go’s engine deprecation is its controller- and there is only one- which has the same limitation. This means it works as a virtual laser pointer, not hands.

Version 19 of the core Oculus Mobile SDK, used by developers of native-Android Quest apps or open source engines, does not deprecate support for Go.

The Oculus Unity & Unreal SDK integrations provide a number of modifiable helper scripts, assets, and examples to developers. As Facebook’s views and understanding of spatial design changes over time, it may want to take paths that simply don’t work with a single rotational laser pointer locked in space.

Almost all VR Go apps are made with Unity or Unreal, so developers may choose to no longer release updates to Go versions. Facebook retired its Rooms social service on Go late last year and says it will support its upcoming Horizon social networking service on the Rift Platform and Quest, saying “full interactivity is core to the Facebook Horizon experience.”

While initially enthusiastic about 3DoF VR with Samsung Gear VR in 2014 and Go in 2018, the success of Quest means 3DoF just doesn’t seem to have a place in Facebook’s future VR plans.

The post Oculus Unity & Unreal SDKs Deprecate Oculus Go Support appeared first on UploadVR.

Beginning of the End – Latest Oculus SDK Version Drops Support for Go

The end for Oculus Go is nigh. The latest Oculus SDK (v19/1.51) no longer supports the company’s first true standalone VR headset.

The company says in the SDK’s developer release notes that both Unity and Unreal Engine support for Oculus Go has officially been dropped. Facebook says developers can still use Oculus Integration v18.0 or prior, although this effectively puts another small fire under developers to either finish up their Go projects soon, or migrate them to Quest.

All of this should come as no surprise to Go developers however, as Facebook announced back in late June that it would be retiring Oculus Go.

SEE ALSO
Beginning of the End – Latest Oculus SDK Version Drops Support for Go
Multiple Leaked Photos Show Possible Quest 2, September Reveal Rumored”]

While the headset’s system software will still receive bug fixes and security patches through 2022, the company said it would be starting down the path of phasing out the headset, culminating in a complete content pipeline freeze in December 2020.

Despite its lack of positional tracking and motion controllers, the cheap and cheerful 3DOF headset attracted many VR newcomers thanks to its positioning as an accessible, casual content device. Starting at $200 for the 32GB version, and later knocked down to $150 in January 2020, it still represents the cheapest way to get into reasonably good VR.

Although it was clearly priced to fly off the shelves at launch in May 2018 and obviously also resonated with consumers during holiday rushes, Facebook has said that Oculus Go will be their last 3DOF device, instead favoring Quest as they move forward into an all-6DOF future.

We’re hoping the fabled Oculus Quest 2 brings along with it some price reductions to the previous Quest, which is currently priced at its original launch price tag of $400/$450. Maybe eventually a 6DOF device can fill that low price point too, although there would need to be a hell of a price cut.

The post Beginning of the End – Latest Oculus SDK Version Drops Support for Go appeared first on Road to VR.

Facebook is Retiring Oculus Go, Announces New Content Distribution Platform for Quest

Facebook announced that, at the end of this year, it will officially retire Oculus Go, its 3DOF standalone headset. In early 2021, the company will also be making way for more apps on Quest with a new content distribution platform that will be separate from the Oculus Store.

The company won’t be releasing any new first-party features for Go, effective immediately, the company says in a blog post. Facebook will also be tuning down the headset’s third-party content pipeline later in the year, as the company will no longer accept any new Go apps or app updates after December 4th. No new Go apps will be permitted onto the Oculus Store after December 18th, putting a final lid on the growth of the Go’s content library.

The headset’s system software will however still receive bug fixes and security patches through 2022.

Oculus Go & Gear VR, Photo by Road to VR

Facebook says the move to retire Go is about pushing towards a “future of VR with 6DOF platforms like Oculus Quest.” This presumably also means that Go will be the company’s last 3DOF headset offering.

“As the technology has advanced rapidly since we launched Go, you’ve helped us prove out the value of positional tracking with the incredible experiences you’ve built for 6DOF VR, and we’re ready to double down on that,” the company says in a developer blog post.

Released in May 2018, Oculus Go was hailed as a VR headset priced for the masses. Although hobbled by its rotation-only headtracking and single non-positionally tracked controller, Go was championed for its low price-point of $200 and ability to serve up casual games and traditional streaming content, such as Netflix, Hulu, and YouTube.

SEE ALSO
Samsung is Terminating Its VR Video Apps on All Devices

Opening the Gates for Quest Content

There’s been a greater number of Quest apps to hit the Store recently, however the headset’s library of games is still dwarfed in comparison to both Oculus Go or Oculus Rift.

Facebook has been notably more strict with which apps it allows on Quest since the headset’s launch in mid-2019, as there are both technical hurdles and the apparent need to keep a manicured storefront for new users.

Image courtesy Oculus

Early next year, the company says it will offer a new way to distribute content on Quest, which will allow developers to share their apps to anyone with a Quest.

Details are still thin on the ground, however Facebook appears to be creating an alternative marketplace with a lower technical acceptance threshold than the Oculus Store. Unlike sideloaded apps though, content accepted through this channel will still need to adhere to its Oculus Platform policies and Oculus Content policies.

“By making it easier for more developers to reach Quest owners in the future, we hope to spark inspiration with those who will build the next wave of engaging experiences for Quest,” the company says.

In practice, this may act as a way to stymie sideload-based content stores such as SideQuest, and bring all developers under the same roof, so to speak. Additionally, the still unnamed content channel could act as an avenue for Early Access content, or simply an updated of the old Oculus Share platform back in the heady developer kit days. The company says it will be sharing more info on the new content channel in the future.

The post Facebook is Retiring Oculus Go, Announces New Content Distribution Platform for Quest appeared first on Road to VR.